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Optical Transceiver Interoperability

With so many different types of optical transceivers on the market today and so many variations or flavors the question of how to ensure interoperability between optical transceivers often comes up.


To ensure that optical transceivers can interoperate correctly and therefore establish a successful link there are three main considerations.




First: Wavelength


On any given fiber link, the data is transmitted from end to the other as optical signals which is the function of the optical transceivers at each end of the link. As such, these optical transceivers at each end must be using the same wavelength for that transmission to be successful and if that's not the case then the communication will break down and the link will fail. For instance, if one transceiver is using the 1310nm wavelength and the transceiver at the other end is using the 850nm wavelength then the communication will break down.


Second: Speed


Ensuring that the optical transceivers at either end of the fiber link are talking at the same speed is another critical factor to achieve interoperability. This is especially true now since many transceivers look the same and even have the same footprint. For example, it is possible to insert a 1G SFP into a 10G SFP+ port or vice versa since both these transceivers have the same dimensions and very similar designs. So if you insert a 1G SFP into a 10G SFP+ port, it will work but the transmission speed will be limited to 1G and if the transceiver at the other end is sending data at a 10G rate then the communication will break down. That's why it is important to verify that the optical transceivers at either end of the fiber link are using the same transmission speed to ensure interoperability.


Third: Fiber Type


Another key factor to consider is the fiber type required by the optical transceivers at either end of the link. If you are using single mode fiber on the link, then you must ensure that the transceivers at both ends are compatible with single mode fiber. If one or both of them require multimode fiber then the communication will fail.


In summary, to ensure interoperability between optical transceivers on a fiber link, it is imperative that both transceivers use the same wavelength and speed of transmission and also be compatible with the same fiber type. If any of these three requirements are not met then the communication between the transceivers will not work and the link will fail.


GigOptics - Your Supplier for all optical transceivers


At Gigoptics, we offer a wide range of optical transceivers from 1G to 400G; all tested to ensure quality and reliability. For more information, contact us at info@gigoptics.com.



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